Tag Archives: natural history

New Curriculum Kits

Virginia Tech Insect Collection Curriculum Kit Last Saturday at Hokie Bugfest, we launched our Curriculum Kits (above). These kits contain material for incorporating insect biodiversity into your K-12 science curriculum. The contents include insect specimens (butterfly, beetle, fly, wasp, and … Continue reading

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A checklist of bee species in the Virginia Tech Insect Collection

Sweat bee, Augochlora pura mosieri Cockerell, 1922 (family Halictidae) By Katie Williamson, Derek Hennen, and Paul Marek What’s one of the first things that comes to your mind when describing a bee? A fuzzy, flying insect? Pollination? Or even how … Continue reading

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Curiosities from the cabinets: Lycid beetle mimicry ring

Lycid beetle mimicry ring (A. Lucidota, Lampyridae; B. Limonia, Limoniidae; C. Chaetodactyla, Ptilodactylidae; D. Mesopteron, Lycidae; E. Austrolimnophila, Limoniidae; F. Calopteron, Lycidae; G. Correbidia, Erebidae; H. Calopteron, Lycidae; I. Correbia, Erebidae; J. Lycomorpha, Erebidae; K. Correbidia, Erebidae). Scale bar: 5 … Continue reading

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Bressler longhorned beetle collection

The longhorned beetle, Typocerus zebra (Olivier, 1795) In May, Dr. Ellen Brown of Fredericksburg, Virginia donated the collection of her husband Dr. Barry Lee Bressler (1936 – 2017) to the Virginia Tech Insect Collection. Dr. Bressler, who was born in … Continue reading

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Professor Smyth’s Butterflies

Papered insects of Ellison Smyth, founding head of VT Biological Sciences Did you know that the first football coach of Virginia Tech, Professor Ellison Smyth, was also a butterfly collector? In fact, Professor Smyth was also one of the first … Continue reading

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Milkweed pollinia

Back in April I posted an image of a Sphex sp. wasp with some odd structures on its legs. At the time I suspected the weird things were fungal growths. After some additional research (i.e., I found a photo of a bee … Continue reading

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